When the Virtual and The Real Meet

This past week I went for my annual physical and noted the bilingual signs on Zika by the entrance. It felt strange to smile at signs about the dangers of Zika but after researching about the topic, I reflected that it is because I now have a sense of ownership and responsibility to educate the public about this vector borne disease. As I met with the nurse for blood pressure and the weighing in, she asks, “Have you traveled outside the country in the past 2 weeks?” I answer, “No. Is this a Zika related question?”

She smiles and answers yes.

“Have you had any symptoms of fever, rash, joint pains or conjunctivitis?” I answer no with another knowing smile and she told me that she is not allowed to even touch me without verifying. I asked her where the mandate comes from and she said it is a local county standard for now. She expressed that many have wanted to be tested but mainly pregnant women. It was also stated that it is an expensive test ranging from $600-800. As others in class have interviewed healthcare professionals, it was interesting to personally experience the healthcare process and note how Zika prevention and safety nets in the county reached even me.

Bilingual information for patients by UHealth. I questioned why there was not a Haitian Creole poster as this is normally seen in Miami-Dade County.
Bilingual information for patients by UHealth. I questioned why there was not a Haitian Creole poster as this is normally seen in Miami-Dade County.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Making the Experience Interactive

Taking our storyboard, we used Invision to create hotspots on where users will be tapping using GearVR or Cardboard technology. The simple tap and point option should impress users with the graphics quality in the VR environment. This is why we have discussed as a team that image quality and sounds need to be invested in for the “impress factor” to have a stronger influence. The messages are also being carefully crafted and evolved mixing both professional and lay terminology to ensure accuracy yet information retention. As my teammate has access to the healthcare industry and I am actively asking for user feedback with my ethnographic background, we continue to meet and brainstorm to refine the prototype that we are creating and constantly improving in increments.

A prototype of our experience can be viewed at: https://invis.io/6H95E0NUM#/201388711_Title_Screen

Several options can be selected by users in the VR experience. There are added layers that can be extended, such as the bees having additional information. Expansion and deeper interactivity is the next step in development.
Several options can be selected by users in the VR experience. There are added layers that can be extended, such as the bees having additional information. Expansion and deeper interactivity is the next step in development.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Multimedia Options

As panels of information appear for each item selected, our team is trying to brainstorm for new ways that the panels can be more impressive or interactive. Multimedia options are becoming a possibility. A mixture of videos, short text panels, animations and mini-games would make the experience more immersive which would help with the health message retention.

Our next step is to continue working on an organizaed task list with the second wave of prototyping after user analysis and feeback. This will allow us to add the more complex layers that we are planning for each interactive feature. By referring to our starting task list, we are seeing how we can create a matrix of options using Microsoft Excel and are currently researching the spaces that need attention. We are currently researching further into medical information, VR technology, narratology, game design and ludology.